Hertz teams with Clear to get travelers out of the airport at the speed of L-eye-t

Hertz and biometric kiosk maker, Clear, have partnered to help travelers get their rental cars at light speed.


December 12, 2018

Yesterday, Hertz announced that it will team up with biometric kiosk maker Clear to cut down on the painstaking amount of time it takes to pick up a rental car.

Hertz and Clear will begin with a test program called “Fast Lane” at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport that will allow Clear members to drive cars right off the lot.

Life in the fast lane

In classic biometric fashion, users will be able to leave the lot by showing their mug to one of Clear’s facial-recognition kiosks upon exit.

According to Hertz, it will take 30ish seconds to complete which, according to our calculations, is about 5 hours and 30ish seconds faster than it currently takes to get out of rental car purgatory.

Clear eyes, no wait, can’t lose

Travelers who use Clear typically do so in order to garner a seamless path through airport security to their terminals, but, Clear has recently begun to broaden its horizons.

The Hertz partnership comes on the heels of Clear teaming with Seattle sports stadiums to infuse a state-of-the-art biometric payment method for concessions — most importantly, booze.

If “Fast Lane” takes off, Hertz and Clear plan to expand to over 40 additional locations, including LAX, JFK, and SFO by next year.

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