July 14, 2020

Which jobs are in demand?

America needs more high-skilled workers. We analyzed where the most jobs are.
July 14, 2020
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Please don’t be alarmed if you see people making jazz hands at pedestrian buttons. The company LightGuard Systems has finally delivered a no-touch way to cross the street — all you have to do is wave. 

This is huge news for me personally. I live in a small town, which means the crosswalk isn’t activated automatically. And since the pandemic, I’ve tried every way to cross the street without directly touching the button: I’m talking elbowing, shouldering, even drop-kicking that puppy. 

— Michael Waters, Staff Writer

The Big Idea

America needs higher-skilled workers. Here’s where the jobs are.

Automation has been the labor market’s boogeyman for years. Now the pandemic has created a sense of urgency for workers to uplevel their skills to avoid becoming irrelevant.

As The New York Times reports, middle-class jobs typically require some digital proficiency, even for jobs not considered tech work. As of May, about half of US workers were working remotely — up from only 15% in the Before Times — and automation was already becoming more prevalent in fields ranging from retail to health care to warehouse operations.

Tech is poised to take jobs, but we still need managers

The need for workers with advanced skills is so great that members of Congress have reached across the aisle to draft the Skills Renewal Act, which would award up to $4k in tax credits to newly unemployed workers seeking training in high-demand areas. 

Last year Amazon began “upskilling” employees in anticipation of automating simpler tasks. Other businesses like Exelon, a utility company, implemented a training approach called “co-investing,” which means the company funds in-house training, but employees complete it in their off hours.

So, what training opportunities should people look for?

Data scientists at LinkedIn recently analyzed millions of job listings to determine which ones are in demand, pay a livable wage, and require skills that can be obtained through remote learning.

According to our research, the top 5 meeting all those criteria, ranked by number of LinkedIn job listings, are:

  • Sales representatives (~144k job listings on LinkedIn)
  • Software developer (~125k listings)
  • Project manager (~91k listings)
  • Customer service specialist (~90k listings)
  • Data analyst (~21k listings)

What skills are becoming more important in your industry — and where do you see the most hiring happening? Reply to this email, or drop me a line at [email protected].

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Snippets

🍺  Diageo, one of the world’s largest whiskey producers, just launched an all-paper whiskey bottle. You can expect more where that came from: PepsiCo and Unilever will also test out paper bottles in the next year.

😷  Coca-Cola is COVID-proofing its vending machines. Instead of pressing buttons, now you scan a QR code, which conjures up a set of drink options on your phone.  

💄  Thanks to masks, no one is buying lipstick right now. In the US, sales are down 15%. That’s actually on the lower end of the global spectrum: In Japan, back in May, lipstick purchases had plunged 70%. 

🎮  Things you can buy with $114k: A Porsche. Two years of Harvard tuition. And this singular copy of Super Marios Bros., which just broke the record for most expensive video-game sale. Basically because it’s just super old? 

People are adding horror music to Disney World’s “Welcome Back” video. Let me just say, the trailer song from “Us” really goes a long way. 

Stay Back

These wearable plastic pods are the latest social distancing trend

Listen up, parents: Covering your kids in bubble wrap for their personal safety is so last decade. 

This year, if you really want to protect the young’uns, you better pony up $100 for a WalkingPod

Pod save… come again? 

The startup Under the Weather originally floated onto the scene in 2010 to help with bad weather. If you’re at a sports game and it starts raining, why not ditch the poncho in favor of a Game Day Pod

But Input reports that Under the Weather is pivoting into PPE — and it’s finding new success, especially among health care workers. 

When you roll up for a COVID-19 testing facility, don’t be alarmed if the nurse walks out in something resembling a plastic human tent. That’s just Under the Weather’s IntubationPod at work. 

And good news: If you’re finding individual pods to be too much, now you can buy a tent-like pod for the whole family.

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Unparalleled simplicity: Employee records and workflow management mean one platform can organize and distribute everything.

Painless hiring: their Applicant Tracking System and mobile hiring app will help you get the right people in the right roles — right away

Builds better culture: An internal eNPS score lets your employees constantly rate the company, so you can see what you’re doing right and where you can improve to keep them around long-term. 

Small business focus: 89% of BambooHR’s customers are SMBs, so their product was built specifically to suit their needs.

BambooHR is racking up awards left and right, and scoring big-name customers like Quora (plus 17K+ others) in the process… in other words, they must be doing something everything right. 

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The Hustle Time Machine

‘Peanut steaks’ and ‘nut chops’… The fake meats of the 1900s

This piece is part of a new series where we spotlight historical trends that feel relevant now. Send tips to [email protected]

It’s easy to feel like we’re living in an alternative-meat golden age. 

But rewind 110+ years, and you’ll find a similar trend: Back then, newspapers could not get enough of the explosion of “vegetable meat.” 

Nutty for Nuttose?

In 1896, nutritionist and cereal kingpin John Harvey Kellogg invented his first meat replacement — Nuttose.

It looked a bit like Nuteena, a canned meal made of peanut, soy, and corn that US stores sold until 2005. 

Nuttose was far from alone:

  • In the early 1900s, a Chicago Tribune columnist named Jane Eddington served up recipes for sausages made from a smorgasbord of ingredients: lentils, breadcrumbs, hard-boiled eggs, eggplant, macaroni, and rice. 
  • Then there was The Vegetarian Meat Company, a short-lived corporation that sold “peanut steaks, nut chops and other protein preparations.”
  • Kellogg himself later came out with Nuttolene, a spread that had “the consistency of cream cheese, a meaty flavor and composition.”

Mmm… digestion! 

My favorite take on this all comes from the Evening Kansan-Republican, which in 1901 raved that “vegetable meat” is “almost indistinguishable from beef or mutton.” 

And not to worry — according to the newspaper, “one great advantage of the ‘vegetable meat’ is that it is ‘predigested’: it does away almost altogether with the necessity for the ordinary processes of assimilation.”

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BY THE NUMBERS

$70k: That’s how much you guys have donated to small businesses we’ve profiled that were harmed by COVID-19. Interested in helping families impacted by the pandemic? Consider supporting 1kproject.org, a nonprofit co-founded by a Trends member that helps match needy families with someone committed to sharing $1k/month for 3 months.

Conversation Starters

LinkedIn Stories, IRS snooping, and why you should take that job at a startup

Here are a few other storylines we enjoyed yesterday: 

Is anyone ready for LinkedIn Stories? The feature — which LinkedIn announced a few weeks ago — is starting to roll out in some countries, and the reaction was well summarized by this tweet: “no.”

You can picture it already: People you met at that one conference 3 years ago reciting motivational quotes from their bedroom. Too many uploaded Slack screenshots. And as one user noted, we might be in for a deluge of recruiters posting “job of the day” video blurbs. 

The difference between a “job risk” and a “career risk” matters. For people nervous about abandoning their current job to work for a new startup, MasterClass CEO David Rogier has a few tips.

While joining a startup might involve job risk — in the sense that your job could disappear if the startup fails — it will rarely involve career risk, he says. 

Joining a startup means you get to dust off a fancy new job title, plus you’ll probably be handed a slew of new responsibilities. Strictly in terms of career, making the leap is probably smart. 

I really can’t imagine a notification worse than this. Venture capitalist Zak Kukoff logged into LinkedIn this week only to read these words: “Accountant at Internal Revenue Service viewed your profile.” The only thing more chilling? If “Accountant at IRS” started posting LinkedIn Stories. 

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The Hustle Says

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NASA finally invented the world’s most versatile shorts. Oh wait, no, that was Vuori. Damn. Give those designers a raise. Get 20% off Vuori’s Banks Short and see what we mean.*

The internet’s best money-saving tool? Honey, the new browser extension from Paypal. It finds, tests, and applies coupon codes to your cart, saving the average user $126 each year. The best part? It’s free and only takes two minutes to install.*

*This is a sponsored post.

Stocks Section Header Hustle Horoscope

A super-serious look at what’s coming your way, if stars align. 

Bison’s big comeback: For the first time in 6k years, bison will roam Britain — thanks to a £1m reintroduction project. One bull and 3 cows will be released into the wild, helping boost the wildlife profile of one of the world’s most nature-depleted countries. 

Prediction: Woolly mammoths, your day is coming

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