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EMAILED ON July 9, 2018 BY Zachary Crockett

Yet another study shows that open office plans are terrible

Today, about 70% of all US offices are “open concept” — no cubicles, no partitions, no private desks: just rows of tables and computers, with employees sitting shoulder to shoulder.

This type of work environment is championed for encouraging interaction, collaboration, and openness…

But research tells us otherwise

A recent study out of Harvard Business School that tracked an office redesign from a cubicle to open space found that face-to-face interaction actually decreased by 72%, and workers become far less productive.

Over the years, a number of other studies have found that open plans have similarly detrimental effects, including:

  • An average 15% decline in productivity
  • A 50% increase in the likelihood of getting sick
  • An increase in the number of distractions per hour

In fact, as many as 60% of employees who work in open floor plan spaces report being dissatisfied with them.

So why do employers insist on using them?

It’s simple: Open office spaces are cheaper than traditional office spaces. All that’s really needed are a few long tables and some chairs.

They’re also more flexible for startups that anticipate rapid growth (it’s easier to squeeze a few more people at a table than find more floor space for another cubicle).

And lastly, it makes it a hell of a lot easier to pelt Dave from sales with a Nerf gun dart from across the room.

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