Admitting bigger breach, Zuck updates terms and invites you to scream into your pillow

Hours before admitting that “most” of Facebook’s 2.2B users have had their data stolen, Facebook announced its first major update to its user terms since 2015. Facebook claims the terms update was in the works before the Cambridge Analytica breach that they now believe affected 87m users (up from an estimated 50m) — but they’re […]


April 5, 2018

Hours before admitting that “most” of Facebook’s 2.2B users have had their data stolen, Facebook announced its first major update to its user terms since 2015.

Facebook claims the terms update was in the works before the Cambridge Analytica breach that they now believe affected 87m users (up from an estimated 50m) — but they’re scrambling to placate users before they #deletefacebook.

So how is Facebook changing the way they collect data?

According to Facebook, they’re not — the revised terms make existing user policies easier to understand without affecting the data they collect or even asking for new permissions. 

Basically, Facebook doesn’t think it was wrong to mine your data — maintaining it helps you connect with friends — but now it does feel responsible for putting a lock on the vault they keep it in.

Facebook will restrict 3rd-party API access, but not their own access to user data. Users won’t be able to do anything about it, but at least now they know that Facebook has monitored their mouse movements, nearby devices, messenger histories, and proximity to cell towers all along.

If you’ve got questions or comments, you’re invited to chime in…

But Facebook admits it probably won’t read them. Regardless, you’ll have to agree to the revised terms by next week.

Whether or not he listens to users, Mucky Zuck will listen to Congress next week — because what they say will partially determine how quickly Facebook climbs out of a $90B hole.

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